Wednesday, September 9, 2020

God's Idiots

When it comes to science and religion the twain shall not meet.  I discovered that living in Nashville where the zealots have  determined that their facts about anything with regards to science is irrelevant, all God cares about is in belief and that belief transcends fact. Hmm where have we heard that before. Again I did not embrace Atheism until Nashville and then I was out, loud and proud.

I look back at Nashville with utter amazement as frankly I did not know one kind, generous person. NOT ONE. They are hypocrites, obsessed with money and of course insatiable needy or permanently aggrieved.  Plastered on smiles or permanent frowns covers their faces and what defines hospitality is an invitation to their Church. The reason being is that in a one industry town as Nashville is, the music industry takes most of the money and that spillover falls into Churches on Sunday when the guilt about all the dumping and humping kicks in and they thump on Sunday to ask for forgiveness. Then in the perpetual laundromat of hell they lather, rinse, repeat and on Monday they wait for Friday to do it again. So Church invitations are membership recruitment akin to cults to get you there and suck all the money the can from you.   They are spiritual vampires.  When it comes to science and religion the twain shall not meet.  I discovered that living in Nashville where the zealots have  determined that their facts about anything with regards to science is irrelevant, all God cares about is in belief and that belief transcends fact. Hmm where have we heard that before. Again I did not embrace Atheism until Nashville and then I was out, loud and proud.

I look back at Nashville with utter amazement as frankly I did not know one kind, generous person. NOT ONE. They are either insatiably needy or permanently aggrieved.  Plastered on smiles or permanent frowns covers their faces and what defines hospitality is an invitation to their Church. The reason being is that in a one industry town as Nashville is, the music industry takes most of the money and that spillover falls into Churches on Sunday when the guilt about all the dumping and humping kicks in and they thump on Sunday to ask for forgiveness. Then in the perpetual laundromat of hell they lather, rinse, repeat and on Monday they wait for Friday to do it again. So Church invitations are membership recruitment akin to cults to get you there and suck all the money the can from you.   They are spiritual vampires.  None fits the bill better than my former friend, Ethan. What a nasty ass child he was and is.  And all of over sex, drugs and booze. The trifecta of sin and salvation.. the trinity is right there folks in that three some.. pun intended. And was attending some online religious seminary school to become a minister, akin to a roving bandit is the best I can presume as he was unclear about what/where he was going to lead his flock.   His obsession with Christ likely means death at 32 like his obsession.  DEAR GOD that is the most kind thing I can say about those people. They are fucked up beyond belief.

Here are two stories about these idiots who profess to love God over truth. Their truth however they have no problem with. One is Tennessee' Abortion law which again continues to demonstrate that the Volunteer state is one you could voluntarily leave when you fail to agree with their politics. In normal places you vote to get rid of the idiots who come up with these laws but in a State that is 50th on population percent that votes (yes 50 of out of 50) which they seem to have no problem with passing more restrictive voting laws to maintain as such is this shocking, no, not really


A new lawsuit targeting Gov. Bill Lee's controversial reproductive access laws was filed Monday, focused on a medical disagreement over the concept of "abortion reversal."

The legislation, which Lee signed into law July 13, would enact some of the nation's most restrictive abortion regulations — including requiring abortion clinics to post a sign in the waiting area and in patient rooms informing people that it may be possible to reverse a chemical abortion.

Failing to do so can result in a $10,000 fine for the clinic, though that portion of the new law would take effect Oct. 1.

But there remains no medical consensus on whether that reversal is possible, USA Today found.

The lawsuit argues that requiring doctors to share these claims violates their First Amendment rights because it is "compelled speech" that relies on "false and misleading information with which they disagree," insists they refer patients to a government-run website to "partake in experimental and unproven treatments that run counter to their patients’ best interests," and runs counter to their ethical obligations as medical provides.

“Patients have to be able to trust that their doctors are being honest with them and providing evidence-based medical information, not a biased, politically motivated script designed to shame them. Forcing doctors to share misinformation with patients is cruel during normal times and downright dangerous during a pandemic," Ashley Coffield, CEO of Planned Parenthood of Tennessee and North Mississippi, said in a statement.

"And yet they still went ahead and passed this law in a desperate attempt to score political points. We have no choice but to fight back because the health and safety of our patients is our top priority."

Monday's filing is in addition to another ongoing federal lawsuit against the new law. It asks the courts to block the law before it's scheduled to take effect on Oct. 1 — in addition to the existing injunction currently blocking its implementation.
ty ass child he was and is.  And all of over sex, drugs and booze. The trifecta of sin and salvation.. the trinity is right there folks in that three some.. pun intended. 

Here are two stories about these idiots who profess to love God over truth. Their truth however they have no problem with. One is Tennessee' Abortion law which again continues to demonstrate that the Volunteer state is one you could voluntarily leave when you fail to agree with their politics. In normal places you vote to get rid of the idiots who come up with these laws but in a State that is 50th on population percent that votes (yes 50 of out of 50) which they seem to have no problem with passing more restrictive voting laws to maintain as such is this shocking, no, not really


A new lawsuit targeting Gov. Bill Lee's controversial reproductive access laws was filed Monday, focused on a medical disagreement over the concept of "abortion reversal."

The legislation, which Lee signed into law July 13, would enact some of the nation's most restrictive abortion regulations — including requiring abortion clinics to post a sign in the waiting area and in patient rooms informing people that it may be possible to reverse a chemical abortion.

Failing to do so can result in a $10,000 fine for the clinic, though that portion of the new law would take effect Oct. 1.

But there remains no medical consensus on whether that reversal is possible, USA Today found.

The lawsuit argues that requiring doctors to share these claims violates their First Amendment rights because it is "compelled speech" that relies on "false and misleading information with which they disagree," insists they refer patients to a government-run website to "partake in experimental and unproven treatments that run counter to their patients’ best interests," and runs counter to their ethical obligations as medical provides.

“Patients have to be able to trust that their doctors are being honest with them and providing evidence-based medical information, not a biased, politically motivated script designed to shame them. Forcing doctors to share misinformation with patients is cruel during normal times and downright dangerous during a pandemic," Ashley Coffield, CEO of Planned Parenthood of Tennessee and North Mississippi, said in a statement.

"And yet they still went ahead and passed this law in a desperate attempt to score political points. We have no choice but to fight back because the health and safety of our patients is our top priority."

Monday's filing is in addition to another ongoing federal lawsuit against the new law. It asks the courts to block the law before it's scheduled to take effect on Oct. 1 — in addition to the existing injunction currently blocking its implementation.

The new law would ban abortions after the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected, which can be as early as six weeks, and if the doctor knows that the woman is seeking an abortion because of the child's sex, race or Down syndrome diagnosis.

The laws also make it a Class C felony for a doctor to perform an abortion in any of those situations.

The new law is not the only Tennessee limit on abortion before the federal courts.

This latest push against the state's efforts this year was supplemental to a long-running suit against Tennessee's required 48-hour waiting period before an abortion. It remains pending before a federal judge, as it has for five years.

"Gov. Lee strongly believes we must protect the rights of the most vulnerable in our state, and there are none more vulnerable than the unborn," Lee spokesperson Gillum Ferguson said Monday. "We look forward to defending this law in the courts to protect the dignity of every human life in Tennessee.









‘I want the people of God to enjoy liberty’: Pastor at Maine super-spreader wedding gives defiant indoor sermon
By Zoe Greenberg Globe Staff,Updated August 31, 2020, 7:26 p.m.
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Pastor Todd Bell of Calvary Baptist Church in Sanford (right) officiated at a wedding that has been linked to Maine's largest coronavirus outbreak.
Pastor Todd Bell of Calvary Baptist Church in Sanford (right) officiated at a wedding that has been linked to Maine's largest coronavirus outbreak.Tammy Wells/Journal-Tribune

The officiant of a now-infamous wedding in Millinocket gave a defiant sermon during an indoor church service on Sunday, just a day after Maine’s CDC announced it was investigating a coronavirus outbreak among those affiliated with the Sanford church.

Todd Bell, the pastor, portrayed Calvary Baptist Church, which he leads, as being on the front lines of a culture war, battling against a “socialistic platform” that mandates mask-wearing and distance learning in schools.

“I’ll tell you what the world wants all the churches to do,” Bell said during one of two Sunday services, which the church posted on YouTube. “They want us to shut down, go home, and let people get used to that just long enough until we can finally stop the advancing of the Gospel.”

Bell’s comments echoed some of the political talking points that President Trump and others on the right have used to decry coronavirus restrictions. At a rally in New Hampshire on Friday night, for example, Trump lamented that Democrats “don’t believe law-abiding citizens can go to a church together. You can’t go to church anymore.”
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The Aug. 7 wedding at which Bell officiated in East Millinocket has been linked to 123 coronavirus cases in Maine, the largest outbreak in the state, as well as to the death of Theresa Dentremont, an 83-year-old woman who did not attend the event. Many of the participants in the wedding, including the bride and groom, went silent as the fallout grew, switching their social media accounts to private.
Related: How an intimate wedding in rural Maine led to the state’s largest COVID outbreak

But Bell’s sermon on Sunday, at his church 225 miles south of the scene of the wedding, was fiery and unrepentant, indicating just how politicized the coronavirus has become, even in communities that have been affected by it. At times, he seemed to delight in provocation, saying that he hoped media outlets would watch the service. He did not respond to a request from the Globe for comment.

Churches have been political battlegrounds during the coronavirus, as well as occasional hot spots, with more than 650 cases linked to houses of worship and religious events since the pandemic began, according to a New York Times database in early July.

On Sunday morning, a 15-person choir assembled onstage at Calvary Baptist, maskless, and sang hymns.

The state of Maine says “cloth face coverings must be worn by all attendees when physical distancing is difficult to maintain” at worship services and also that “choirs are strongly discouraged.” When asked by the Globe whether the Sanford church was violating state rules, the Maine CDC said only that there was an ongoing investigation into the outbreak.

Gib Parrish, an epidemiologist in Maine, said that, based on what the Globe described of the service, the Sunday gathering appeared to increase the risk of participants contracting the coronavirus.

“If there are people who are likely to be positive in that group, then having an extended period of time together — particularly if they’re close by, [and] they’re not doing anything in terms of physical distancing or wearing masks, if they’re singing or shouting or talking loudly — those are activities that are known to facilitate transmission of the virus,” Parrish said.

Bell said in the sermon that the church was discouraging people from coming if they were sick and advising them to quarantine at home.

The pastor also warned his congregants that a vaccine against the coronavirus would include “aborted baby tissue,” an issue that some religious and antiabortion groups have seized upon in recent months. A number of vaccines, including those against rubella, chickenpox, and shingles, were manufactured using fetal cells from elective abortions decades ago, but the cell lines that continue to grow the vaccines are now generations removed from fetal cells. In April, a group including committee chairmen from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, urged the Food and Drug Administration not to develop a coronavirus vaccine using cell lines that originated from fetal cells.

Bell said that instead of trusting a vaccine, he would put his faith in God, “the one that has the power to remove pestilences.”

The CDC said on Saturday there were at least five confirmed cases involving people who attended the church, and that anyone who had attended services or vacation Bible school at Calvary was potentially exposed. Bell said on Sunday that all five people who had tested positive were out of quarantine and doing “fairly well.”

“I officiated the wedding. It was a beautiful wedding,” Bell told his congregation. “Six families from our church went there. We never expected to get COVID. Nobody expected to experience the things that happened because you went to a beautiful wedding like that.”

He situated his and the church’s response firmly on political ground, saying that he had told Dr. Nirav Shah, director of the Maine CDC, during a Zoom call on Friday that he was a “liberty lover.”

“I want the people of God to enjoy liberty,” Bell told the congregation. “If they want to wear a mask, wear a mask . . . If you want to have the liberty to have done your own research — that masks are kind of like trying to keep a mosquito out of a chain-link fence . . . if that’s what they choose, I’m a liberty lover.”

It’s not surprising that political affiliations have become connected to coronavirus behaviors, said Martha Lincoln, a medical anthropologist at San Francisco State University.

“Epidemics are particularly political, because unlike other kinds of health experiences in society, everyone is aware of them. By nature, they’re public events. They’re often happening very quickly and creating a lot of anxieties that bring a lot of other social, political, and economic anxieties to the surface,” Lincoln said.

Bell, in the videotaped sermon posted on YouTube, said he had received negative pushback for officiating at the wedding and used a story of hostile comments on social media to riff on Matthew 5:11-12: “Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven.”

“Men have reviled me,” the pastor told his congregation. Bell described someone on social media who had seen that he was flying to Oxford, Maine — he is a pilot — and commented that he was probably going to spread COVID at the casino there.

“Be a good place to spread it,” Bell said. A congregant cheered in the background.

“Gambling has killed more people and ruined more homes and destroyed more things in our society almost than liquor or pot or pornography,” Bell went on. “Gambling is wicked.

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